books v film, Horror Writing

Books V Film: The Shining

Stephen King’s The Shining by Stanley Kubrick is perhaps one of the most well-known horror films out in the world today.

Many will be familiar with the story, the quotes, memorable moments and the countless spoof versions roaming the land.

The Simpsons one is my personal favourite, I love the scene of the blood coming out of the elevator, Mr Burns is not freaked out but confused as the blood normally gets off on a different floor, oh and Homer scaring himself by looking in the mirror is awesome.

But spoofs aside, the book was pretty different, at least in places. To the point where there are rumours that King strongly disliked the Kubrick film due to these changes.

Today I want to talk about the differences between Stephen King’s story and Stanley Kubrick’s cinematic version.

books v film, Horror Writing, Uncategorized

Books v Film: A thought.

I’ve been writing a lot lately about books v films, talking about the adaptation process from book to film and what gets changed or lost as a result.

I was going to write about Horns today (awesome book read it, also awesome film watch it) but it got me thinking, which lead to something of a mental tangent.

With Horns, I saw the film before I read the book and to be honest, this is my preferred way to do things. I often find that if I watch the film after reading the book, I will nearly always prefer the book, although there may be the odd exception.

books v film, Horror Writing

Books v Film: Haunting of Hill House

Personally, I love series’ as a vehicle for turning books to film. In my opinion, books going to film doesn’t often work simply because you don’t have the same level of time with a film that you do a book. A series negates that problem, you have tons of time for tension building, character building and storytelling. Take Game of Thrones for an example, there are 69 episodes, at the time of writing, of this show! At least an hour or more a piece. That’s a ton of time! Now imagine each season was condensed down into a 2hr film. Think of what you’d lose.

Recently Netflix released The Haunting of Hill House, its awesome, go watch it. The second season has trailers out now and everything and I’m very excited for it to start. This is a perfect example of why a series worked well, it was tense in places, had great characters and a gripping, engaging story. I’m not saying none of the film adaptations worked but none of them managed to capture the feel of the book as well as the series did.

Anyway, today I want to talk about turning this story into ‘film’

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